John T. Wilson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Vanderbilt University

ESB 364

(615) 322-6406

john.t.wilson@vanderbilt.edu

 

John T. Wilson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Chemical & Biomolecular Enginering

Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering 

Interdisciplinary Materials Science Graduate Program

Cancer Biology Graduate Program

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology

Vanderbilt Center for Immunobiology

Vanderbilt Institute for Inflammation, Infection and Immunity

Education:

Cancer Research Institute Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Washington, 2013

Ph.D. Bioengineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009

Bachelor of Science, Bioengineering, Oregon State University Honors College, 2002

 

Biosketch:

John T. Wilson is an Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Vanderbilt University. He received his B.S. in Bioengineering from the Oregon State University Honors College, where he also trained in a number of academic and industrial research labs, including the Oregon Medical Laser Center and Bayer Pharmaceuticals. He went on to pursue his doctoral studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology, under the mentorship of Dr. Elliot L. Chaikof, M.D., Ph.D. (currently at BIDMC/Harvard) in the Department of Surgery at Emory University and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech where he was awarded a Whitaker Foundation Graduate Fellowship. Dr. Wilson subsequently joined the laboratory of Patrick Stayton in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington for a postdoctoral fellowship in the area of molecularly engineered materials for the delivery of vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Dr. Wilson was awarded an Irvington Institute-Cancer Research Institute Fellowship under the co-mentorship of Dr. Mary (Nora) Disis, M.D., head of the Tumor Vaccine Group at the University of Washington.

He started his independent laboratory at Vanderbilt in January of 2014, where his group works at the interface of molecular engineering and immunology to innovate technologies to improve human health. His multidisciplinary research program is supported by productive and synergistic collaborations with oncologists, cancer biologists, immunologists, chemists, and other engineers. Since establishing his lab at Vanderbilt, he has been awarded the NSF CAREER Award, an ‘A’ Award from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, a Melanoma Research Alliance Young Investigator Award, an Innovative Research Grant from Stand Up To Cancer, and has been named an Emerging Investigator by Biomaterials Science.